Hatred for none

Canadians are to be commended for the manner in which they have come together following these tragic killings in Ottawa and Quebec.

The tragic events in Ottawa and Quebec last week have shocked the nation.

A few lines from across the newswires—

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the deceased and we offer our heartfelt condolences to the family and friends of the soldier who gave his life in last weeks’ attacks in Ottawa as well as the soldier who was killed earlier in the week in St-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec.”

“As Canadians, we pray that God Almighty protect all Canadians from harm and that these terrorists are brought to justice.”

“The Islamic community ‘must ask with one voice if it is doing enough to stop those elements of the community who radicalise’ young Muslims.”

“I’m shocked and strongly denounce these heinous attacks on the lives of those who dedicate themselves to protect our great nation.”

The statements above share a common source. All came from the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community (an international Islamic organization, with branches in over 200 countries).

In making such statements they risk bringing violence down on themselves. Indeed, according to online news sources only two weeks ago another soldier was gunned down —this one an ex-serviceman of Pakistan Air Force who was an Ahmadiyya Muslim.

Canadians are to be commended for the manner in which they have come together following these tragic killings. They ought be proud of the national display of both enduring resolve and restraint, at a time when it would have been too easy to call for attacks upon the wider Muslim community.

“Love for All, Hatred for None” is the title of a pamphlet produced by the Ahmadiyya Muslin Community – International.

It has much the same ring to it as the words of Martin Luther King, Jr.: “Love is the only force capable of transforming an enemy into a friend.”

 

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