True North Paranormal co-hosts Karina Kozuska (left) and husband Jon pose for a cramped photo-op inside a cell beneath Greenwood city hall Friday, June 4. Photo: Laurie Tritschler

True North Paranormal co-hosts Karina Kozuska (left) and husband Jon pose for a cramped photo-op inside a cell beneath Greenwood city hall Friday, June 4. Photo: Laurie Tritschler

Paranormal investigators dig into potential Greenwood hauntings

A TV crew from True North Paranormal began filming at City Hall Friday, June 4

Paranormal investigators began looking into possible hauntings in Greenwood last week, laying the groundwork for a TV production to appear next year on the streaming services Amazon Prime and Paraflix.

The search for answers got underway at city hall Friday evening, June 4, as True North Paranormal co-hosts Jon and Karina Kozuska set up a panoply of high-tech gear in the building that once doubled as a provincial courthouse.

READ MORE: Paranormal investigators coming to Greenwood

READ MORE: Former premier W.A.C. Bennett may be haunting his old house

The top storey courtroom and basement jailhouse are normally off-limits to visitors at 202 South Government St., but the Times/Gazette went behind the velvet ropes with the husband and wife duo.

The basement was creepy enough — ghosts or no ghosts. Heading down the lobby staircase was like taking a time machine into the underground dungeon beneath council chambers.

Jon Kozuska peers at the camera from inside a basement cell he said once held people awaiting trial in solitary confinement. Photo: Laurie Tritschler

Jon Kozuska peers at the camera from inside a basement cell he said once held people awaiting trial in solitary confinement. Photo: Laurie Tritschler

“A lot of homework goes into an investigation,” Jon said, pointing to an infrared camera trained on two of the holding pens. There were a total of 12 motion-detecting cameras throughout the building, each designed to film in infrared light.

“I’ve done substantial research on this building, specifically, and this city more broadly,” he added. Stood next to Karina, who identifies as a “psychic medium,” Jon declined to elaborate on what his research turned up. This would have tampered with his wife’s readings over the weekend, he pointed out, qualifying that, “a location isn’t haunted until it shows me it is.”

“I do feel that there’s something here,” Karina shared, adding that it felt like energy left by someone who’d spent time in the stocks.

She and Jon had just posed for a photo op in one of the cells. The space was oppressively confining, The Times / Gazette can confirm.

“Whoever spent time in here, I can feel their stress; their anxieties and their jitters,” she explained.

The atmosphere was no less spooky in the upstairs courthouse, where a motion detector on the mezzanine viewing gallery showed signs of a disturbance. The Kozuskas suspended their interview in the old judge’s chambers, springing into the courtroom outside.

Denver Trumbley takes a break from watching cameras trained on potential “hot spots” of paranormal activity throughout Greenwood City Hall. Photo: Laurie Tritschler

Denver Trumbley takes a break from watching cameras trained on potential “hot spots” of paranormal activity throughout Greenwood City Hall. Photo: Laurie Tritschler

Was anybody out there? Jon asked, filming the scene on his cellphone.

Maybe it was the piles of antique furniture strewn hither and thither; the mouldering books thumbed by so many past government agents; or the judge’s robe left on the old bench, but it felt like there had been.

Was someone trying to communicate from the great beyond? Or was The Times / Gazette just over-caffeinated, under-slept and highly excitable?

The reader will have to find out when they watch the finished episode of True North Paranormal.


 

@ltritsch1
laurie.tritschler@grandforksgazette.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.


laurie.tritschler@boundarycreektimes.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Greenwood