Law requires winter tires or chains

Some winter driving tips - just in time for winter.

Winter is here, and you should now

have winter tires on your vehicle.

In fact, if you are driving on highways

with winter travel signs you must have winter

tires or carry chains from Oct. 1 to April 30.

On the RCMP’s winter driving tips

webpage (Get a Grip…with Winter

Tires) they ask: Do I really need winter

tires?  e answer is a resounding yes.

Here’s why: Rubber tends to harden

in cold weather thus reducing friction

and stopping capability of the vehicle.

e new generation winter tires maintain

their elasticity and gripping power

at lower temperatures (-35 C and below),

whereas all season tires tend to sti en

and lose gripping power around 0 C.

A study showed that winter tires reduce

stopping distances by up to 25 per

cent or between two to three car lengths.

at could be the di erence between a

safe stop and a fender bender or worse.

Kate Trotter, public a airs o cer for the

Ministry of Transportation

and Infrastructure,

urges motorists to

“know before they go”

by checking DriveBC

for info about highway

conditions and weather.

Other tips from the

RCMP site:

• Get your vehicle

ready for winter in Fall

• Don’t drive under

the in uence

• Pack an emergency

kit

• Learn and practice

winter driving techniques

before you need

them

• Plan your trip and tell your friends

and family. Check road and weather conditions

• Avoid using overdrive and cruise

control on slippery roads

• Travel with a fully charged cell phone

for emergency situations

• SLOW DOWN and WEAR your

seatbelt

Now here’s three things not do when

winter driving, according to the Ministry

of Transportation and Infrastructure:

1. Don’t get too close to sanding/salting

trucks

If you  nd yourself behind

a plow, keep a safe distance behind

it—200 feet at the least.

Visibility near the plow will

be greatly reduced because of

blowing snow, and if you’re following

too close, you’ll fall into

the plow driver’s blind spot.

Also, keep in mind that the

plow may be spreading winter

abrasive (small rocks) on the

road. Travelling too close could

increase the danger of damaging your

windshield.

2. Never pass a winter maintenance

vehicle of the right

Plows generally are travelling relatively

slowly and it might be tempting to try

and pass them. But these vehicles o en

have attachments, like wind plows, which

can reach 10-12 feet to the right, so if you

have to pass a winter maintenance vehicle,

wait until it’s safe and pass on the le .

3. Don’t expect ice to melt as soon as

it’s sanded.