Indigenous

An Atlantic salmon is seen during a Department of Fisheries and Oceans fish health audit at the Okisollo fish farm near Campbell River, B.C. Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. The executive director of British Columbia’s salmon farmers association says a formalized consultation process for the future of the industry is welcome after several years of “ad hoc” discussions stemming from the Liberal government’s pledge in 2019 to end open-net pen salmon aquaculture off B.C.’s coast.��THE CANADIAN PRESS /Jonathan Hayward

Vancouver Island First Nations worry feds flip-flopping on B.C. fish farms transition

BC Salmon Farmers Association ‘heartened’ after its round of meetings with Fisheries minister

An Atlantic salmon is seen during a Department of Fisheries and Oceans fish health audit at the Okisollo fish farm near Campbell River, B.C. Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. The executive director of British Columbia’s salmon farmers association says a formalized consultation process for the future of the industry is welcome after several years of “ad hoc” discussions stemming from the Liberal government’s pledge in 2019 to end open-net pen salmon aquaculture off B.C.’s coast.��THE CANADIAN PRESS /Jonathan Hayward
A fly fisherman casts on the Kootenai River, downstream from Lake Kookanusa, a reservoir that crosses the border between the U.S. and Canada, on Sept. 19, 2014. First Nations and environmentalists are angry the federal and British Columbia governments continue to stonewall American requests for a joint investigation of cross-border contamination from coal mining in southern B.C.'s Elk Valley. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-The Spokesman Review, Rich Landers

First Nations, environmentalists tired of stonewalling over Kootenays selenium probe

Groups want joint investigation of cross-border contamination from coal mining

A fly fisherman casts on the Kootenai River, downstream from Lake Kookanusa, a reservoir that crosses the border between the U.S. and Canada, on Sept. 19, 2014. First Nations and environmentalists are angry the federal and British Columbia governments continue to stonewall American requests for a joint investigation of cross-border contamination from coal mining in southern B.C.'s Elk Valley. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-The Spokesman Review, Rich Landers
Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald, from left to right, lawyer Nancy Sandy, Williams Lake First Nation Chief Willie Sellars, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Minister of Crown Indigenous Relations Marc Miller walk together on the former grounds of St. Joseph’s Mission Residential School, in Williams Lake, B.C., on Wednesday, March 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Supreme Court will not hear from St. Anne’s residential school survivors

Survivors have fought a years-long battle against Ottawa to release thousands of records

Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald, from left to right, lawyer Nancy Sandy, Williams Lake First Nation Chief Willie Sellars, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Minister of Crown Indigenous Relations Marc Miller walk together on the former grounds of St. Joseph’s Mission Residential School, in Williams Lake, B.C., on Wednesday, March 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Crystal Smith (far left) and husband Raymond Shaw were unable to register their newborn son's name because it uses Kwak'wala characters. Photo contributed

Island couple takes fight with Vital Statistics over Indigenous name to court

Application to register their child’s name was improperly refused, petition to court says

Crystal Smith (far left) and husband Raymond Shaw were unable to register their newborn son's name because it uses Kwak'wala characters. Photo contributed
Marco Mendicino speaks during a news conference in Ottawa, Monday, Sept. 26, 2022. Mendicino visited on Monday families of victims who died during a mass stabbing, then signed an agreement to explore new ways to improve safety on some First Nations in Saskatchewan. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Ottawa signs agreement to find Indigenous policing solutions after mass stabbing

Chief echoed his calls for Ottawa to help his community establish its own police force

Marco Mendicino speaks during a news conference in Ottawa, Monday, Sept. 26, 2022. Mendicino visited on Monday families of victims who died during a mass stabbing, then signed an agreement to explore new ways to improve safety on some First Nations in Saskatchewan. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Small boats make their way through the Frobisher Bay inlet in Iqaluit on Friday, Aug. 2, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Small boats make their way through the Frobisher Bay inlet in Iqaluit on Friday, Aug. 2, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
FILE – Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, then B.C. Representative for Children and Youth, speaks to a reporter in Vancouver, B.C., on Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

UBCIC backs Turpel-Lafond after investigation questions her Indigenous heritage

It is up to Indigenous communities to determine who belongs, not media, union says

FILE – Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, then B.C. Representative for Children and Youth, speaks to a reporter in Vancouver, B.C., on Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
On Sept. 28, Nasukin Jason Louie poses with Facilities and Operations Manager Ken White and Chief Operating Officer Heather Suttie as they accept the funding of $9.5 million for the Seven Nations Soaring Eagles Wellness Centre. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)

Lower Kootenay Band breaks ground on $9.5M treatment centre

The Seven Nations Soaring Eagle Healing Centre near Creston will offer treatment for substance-use disorders

On Sept. 28, Nasukin Jason Louie poses with Facilities and Operations Manager Ken White and Chief Operating Officer Heather Suttie as they accept the funding of $9.5 million for the Seven Nations Soaring Eagles Wellness Centre. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)
Terry Teegee, regional Chief of the B.C. Assembly of First Nations speaks at a meeting between Canada's premiers and Indigenous leaders at the Songhees Wellness Centre on July 1. (Jake Romphf/News Staff)

New First Nations centre coming to B.C. to give economic development guidance

Centre will look at how to better benefit from sectors such as forestry, mining and natural gas

Terry Teegee, regional Chief of the B.C. Assembly of First Nations speaks at a meeting between Canada's premiers and Indigenous leaders at the Songhees Wellness Centre on July 1. (Jake Romphf/News Staff)
Sheila North Wilson, right, grand chief of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak, speaks to media as Derek Nepinak, grand chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, listens in after RCMP announced at a press conference in Winnipeg, March 18, 2016. More than a year after North unsuccessfully ran to lead one of Manitoba’s largest First Nations political organizations, the Cree leader and journalist is ready to try again. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

‘Pushed to the back’: First Nations women under-represented as chiefs in Canada

Between 15 and 18 per cent of chiefs have been women Canada-wide for the past 15 years

Sheila North Wilson, right, grand chief of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak, speaks to media as Derek Nepinak, grand chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, listens in after RCMP announced at a press conference in Winnipeg, March 18, 2016. More than a year after North unsuccessfully ran to lead one of Manitoba’s largest First Nations political organizations, the Cree leader and journalist is ready to try again. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, front right, and Squamish Nation councillor Khelsilem arrive for an announcement and groundbreaking at the First Nation’s Senakw housing development site in Vancouver on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022. A Vancouver residents association has launched a legal bid to quash the services agreement between the city and the Squamish Nation relating to the largest Indigenous-led housing and retail development in Canadian history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Lawsuit targets largest Indigenous-led housing and retail development in B.C. history

Group argues services deal for Squamish Nation’s Senakw project in Vancouver unlawfully approved

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, front right, and Squamish Nation councillor Khelsilem arrive for an announcement and groundbreaking at the First Nation’s Senakw housing development site in Vancouver on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022. A Vancouver residents association has launched a legal bid to quash the services agreement between the city and the Squamish Nation relating to the largest Indigenous-led housing and retail development in Canadian history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
The Parole Board of Canada has denied Tara Desousa, 40, parole once again, out of a belief that they still pose a potentially high risk to the public. This image has been cropped from the original photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

Public safety over Gladue: B.C. dangerous offender denied parole after 25 years behind bars

Tara Desousa was 15 years old when they sexually assaulted an infant in Quesnel in 1997

The Parole Board of Canada has denied Tara Desousa, 40, parole once again, out of a belief that they still pose a potentially high risk to the public. This image has been cropped from the original photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg
A briefing document prepared for the deputy minister of Indigenous Services Canada says there is currently no way to enforce provincial or national building or fire codes for buildings on reserves. But Blaine Wiggins, senior director of the Indigenous Fire Marshals Service, seen in an undated handout photo, says that enforcement gap has “catastrophic” consequences. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Aboriginal Firefighters Association of Canada

No way to enforce fire codes on First Nations, and new law would be costly: document

House fires have long posed a major safety risk to those living on reserve,

A briefing document prepared for the deputy minister of Indigenous Services Canada says there is currently no way to enforce provincial or national building or fire codes for buildings on reserves. But Blaine Wiggins, senior director of the Indigenous Fire Marshals Service, seen in an undated handout photo, says that enforcement gap has “catastrophic” consequences. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Aboriginal Firefighters Association of Canada
Robert Riley Saunders leaving court during a cross examination in Kelowna. (Jacqueline Gelineau/Capital News)

Okanagan Nation Alliance demands inquiry into foster care after fraudulent social worker case

Saunders stole approximately $461,000 intended for 107 primarily Indigenous youth in his care

Robert Riley Saunders leaving court during a cross examination in Kelowna. (Jacqueline Gelineau/Capital News)
Natasha Harrison, second right, is comforted during a vigil for her daughter Tatyanna Harrison, 20, and for Noelle O’Soup, 13, and Chelsea Poorman, 24, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, Sept. 3, 2022. Family members of Indigenous women killed across B.C. say there needs to be more accountability and improved communication between police jurisdictions during investigations of missing people. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Families of missing and murdered Indigenous women seek change ahead of Oct. 4 vigils

Canada-wide Sisters in Spirit vigils Oct. 4 honour missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls

Natasha Harrison, second right, is comforted during a vigil for her daughter Tatyanna Harrison, 20, and for Noelle O’Soup, 13, and Chelsea Poorman, 24, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, Sept. 3, 2022. Family members of Indigenous women killed across B.C. say there needs to be more accountability and improved communication between police jurisdictions during investigations of missing people. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Elder Leonard Bastien, left, and Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, sign a co-stewardship agreement as they announce a new path forward regarding the stewardship of Manitou Asiniy or Manitou Stone, in Edmonton, on Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Creator’s Stone meteorite to be returned to its historic site after over 150 years

145-kilogram iron meteorite landed billions of years ago and has spiritual significance

Elder Leonard Bastien, left, and Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, sign a co-stewardship agreement as they announce a new path forward regarding the stewardship of Manitou Asiniy or Manitou Stone, in Edmonton, on Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
People take part in ceremonies for the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Provinces, territories face calls to make Day for Truth and Reconciliation a holiday

First Nations Leadership Council deeply concerned B.C. had not made Sept. 30 a statutory holiday.

People take part in ceremonies for the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald addresses delegates at the conclusion of the AFN annual general meeting, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, July 7, 2022. The road to reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples in Canada remains a long one, says Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald, who estimates it will take 40 years at the current pace to achieve the more than 90 calls to action in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

National chief says Canada’s reconciliation actions taking long road; 40 years away

Archibald: ‘Progress toward addressing many of the calls to action remains slow’

Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald addresses delegates at the conclusion of the AFN annual general meeting, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, July 7, 2022. The road to reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples in Canada remains a long one, says Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald, who estimates it will take 40 years at the current pace to achieve the more than 90 calls to action in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
The Witness Blanket residential schools art exhibit is now available on a newly launched interactive website. (witnessblanket.ca)

B.C. artist’s Witness Blanket for National Truth and Reconciliation now accessible to all

Created by Carey Newman, the art installation had previously only been viewable in person

The Witness Blanket residential schools art exhibit is now available on a newly launched interactive website. (witnessblanket.ca)
Maxwell Johnson (left) and members of the Heiltsuk Nation gathered outside the BMO on Burrard Street in Vancouver May 5 to announce a settlement has been reached after Johnson and his granddaughter were handcuffed outside the branch two years ago. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)

Heiltsuk man, granddaughter handcuffed outside Vancouver BMO reach settlement with police

VPD promises overhaul of police training, addressing of anti-Indigenous racism

Maxwell Johnson (left) and members of the Heiltsuk Nation gathered outside the BMO on Burrard Street in Vancouver May 5 to announce a settlement has been reached after Johnson and his granddaughter were handcuffed outside the branch two years ago. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)