In the image from video provided by Notre Dame Law School, Supreme Court Justice Samuel Altio speaks at the Notre Dame Law School’s Religious Liberty Summit in Rome, on July 21, 2022. Alito mocked foreign leaders’ criticism of the Supreme Court decision he authored overturning a constitutional right to abortion, in his first public comments since last month’s ruling.(Notre Dame Law School via AP)

VIDEO: U.S. Justice mocks Trudeau, other foreign leaders critical of Roe v. Wade overturning

Justice Samuel Altio made remarks at religious liberty conference in Rome

In the image from video provided by Notre Dame Law School, Supreme Court Justice Samuel Altio speaks at the Notre Dame Law School’s Religious Liberty Summit in Rome, on July 21, 2022. Alito mocked foreign leaders’ criticism of the Supreme Court decision he authored overturning a constitutional right to abortion, in his first public comments since last month’s ruling.(Notre Dame Law School via AP)
(Pixaby photo)

B.C.’s seniors advocate urges seniors and caregivers to prepare for rising temperatures

Dual focus during high temperatures is to keep the room cool and to keep the body cool

(Pixaby photo)
Carolyn Bennett rises during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, June 10, 2022. Canada’s minister of mental health and addictions says more doctors across the country should be willing to prescribe a safer supply of drugs instead of fearing they will be investigated by their regulatory colleges.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

More doctors across Canada should prescribe safer drugs to reduce overdoses: minister

Physicians who prescribe pharmaceutical-grade alternatives could better support patients: college

Carolyn Bennett rises during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, June 10, 2022. Canada’s minister of mental health and addictions says more doctors across the country should be willing to prescribe a safer supply of drugs instead of fearing they will be investigated by their regulatory colleges.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
This 2014 illustration made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention depicts a polio virus particle. On Thursday, July 21, 2022, New York health officials reported a polio case, the first in the U.S. in nearly a decade. (Sarah Poser, Meredith Boyter Newlove/CDC via AP)

New York reports 1st US polio case in nearly a decade

Polio was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 1979, meaning there was no longer routine spread

This 2014 illustration made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention depicts a polio virus particle. On Thursday, July 21, 2022, New York health officials reported a polio case, the first in the U.S. in nearly a decade. (Sarah Poser, Meredith Boyter Newlove/CDC via AP)
Premiers mingle during a photo op while at the summer meeting of the Canada’s Premiers at the Fairmont Empress in Victoria, Monday, July 11, 2022. Provinces, territories and municipalities across the country have been sent more than $2.85 billion, courtesy of the federal government.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Federal government sends $2B in health transfers, other funding to provinces

Transfer comes days after premiers heavily critical of Liberals for not funding health-care enough

Premiers mingle during a photo op while at the summer meeting of the Canada’s Premiers at the Fairmont Empress in Victoria, Monday, July 11, 2022. Provinces, territories and municipalities across the country have been sent more than $2.85 billion, courtesy of the federal government.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Premiers mingle during a photo op while at the summer meeting of the Canada’s Premiers at the Fairmont Empress in Victoria, Monday, July 11, 2022. The premiers try again to make their case for a permanent increase in federal health transfers, they’re also waiting on $2 billion they were promised back in March to help clear surgical and diagnostic backlogs.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Premiers mingle during a photo op while at the summer meeting of the Canada’s Premiers at the Fairmont Empress in Victoria, Monday, July 11, 2022. The premiers try again to make their case for a permanent increase in federal health transfers, they’re also waiting on $2 billion they were promised back in March to help clear surgical and diagnostic backlogs.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Premier John Horgan gestures during a break from a meeting of Canada’s premiers at the Songhees Wellness Centre in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, July 11, 2022 THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Horgan urges federal government to carry half the health-care load as premiers meet

Premier: ‘We need to reimagine public health care in Canada’

Premier John Horgan gestures during a break from a meeting of Canada’s premiers at the Songhees Wellness Centre in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, July 11, 2022 THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Shannon McKenney, shown in a handout photo, has been having severe migraines consecutively for about 1,500 days. Her story is one of several noted in an application submitted in court on behalf of more than 100 health-care professionals from across the country. They are challenging the federal minister of health’s decision to reject their applications to use restricted psychedelic drugs as part of training in psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Shannon McKenney **MANDATORY CREDIT**

More than 100 health-care professionals challenge rejection of psilocybin access

Health Canada did not immediately provide comment on the request for a judicial review

Shannon McKenney, shown in a handout photo, has been having severe migraines consecutively for about 1,500 days. Her story is one of several noted in an application submitted in court on behalf of more than 100 health-care professionals from across the country. They are challenging the federal minister of health’s decision to reject their applications to use restricted psychedelic drugs as part of training in psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Shannon McKenney **MANDATORY CREDIT**
Protesters gather outside as premiers meet inside during the summer meeting of the Canada’s Premiers at the Fairmont Empress in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, July 11, 2022 THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Public health-care system on ‘brink of disaster,’ Canadian nurses federation says

Nurses outline crisis at premiers summit, Kenney wants climate change plan talk

Protesters gather outside as premiers meet inside during the summer meeting of the Canada’s Premiers at the Fairmont Empress in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, July 11, 2022 THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
A jar full of empty COVID-19 vaccine vials is shown at the Junction Chemist pharmacy during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on April 6, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
A jar full of empty COVID-19 vaccine vials is shown at the Junction Chemist pharmacy during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on April 6, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Patrick Bélanger, of Quebec City, is seen in an undated handout photo. Belanger says he was denied surgery for a week after he fell and broke his jaw, cheekbone and orbital bone and ended up in the emergency room of a hospital in B.C., where a surgeon told him he couldn’t do the operation because Quebec “doesn’t pay.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Patrick Belanger, *MANDATORY CREDIT*

Hospital ‘nightmare’ in B.C. for Quebec patient denied surgery: father

‘Gross incompetence on the part of the hospital and a failure of the Canadian health-care system’

Patrick Bélanger, of Quebec City, is seen in an undated handout photo. Belanger says he was denied surgery for a week after he fell and broke his jaw, cheekbone and orbital bone and ended up in the emergency room of a hospital in B.C., where a surgeon told him he couldn’t do the operation because Quebec “doesn’t pay.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Patrick Belanger, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
Pictured during 2015, Aaron Craven (right) is with his mother, Patricia Craven (center), and his father, Donald Craven (left), who passed away in 2018. (Photo: Aaron Craven/ B.C. Alzheimer's Society).

Advocates want more consistency in B.C.’s extended care visitation policies post-pandemic

Constantly shifting rules around essential visitors hard on people’s mental health

Pictured during 2015, Aaron Craven (right) is with his mother, Patricia Craven (center), and his father, Donald Craven (left), who passed away in 2018. (Photo: Aaron Craven/ B.C. Alzheimer's Society).
Dr. Bijoy Menon, a professor at the University of Calgary Foothills Medical Centre, describes his part in the largest stroke clinical trial ever run in Canada, in Calgary, Alta., Wednesday, June 22, 2022.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

‘It saves lives’: Medical study says established heart drug good for strokes, too

Tenecteplase shown to be an effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke

Dr. Bijoy Menon, a professor at the University of Calgary Foothills Medical Centre, describes his part in the largest stroke clinical trial ever run in Canada, in Calgary, Alta., Wednesday, June 22, 2022.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
In this March 2021 file photo provided by Pfizer, vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine are prepared for packaging at the company’s facility in Puurs, Belgium. (Pfizer via AP)
In this March 2021 file photo provided by Pfizer, vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine are prepared for packaging at the company’s facility in Puurs, Belgium. (Pfizer via AP)
People sit and lie in the sun at Kitsilano Beach Park as temperatures reached highs into 20s in Vancouver on Saturday, May 9, 2020,. (Photo: THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck).

If you can’t stand the heat: Tips to stay cool in B.C.’s first heat wave of the summer

Temperatures expected to top 30 C this weekend in many parts of B.C.

People sit and lie in the sun at Kitsilano Beach Park as temperatures reached highs into 20s in Vancouver on Saturday, May 9, 2020,. (Photo: THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck).
June 19, 2022 was the six year anniversary of the attack on Jessie Simpson, leaving him in a wheelchair and requiring 24/7 care (Sue Simpson/Facebook)

Kamloops mom recalls brutal baseball bat attack on son, 6 years later

Mom Sue continues to fundraise to cover costs of bringing her son home on weekends

June 19, 2022 was the six year anniversary of the attack on Jessie Simpson, leaving him in a wheelchair and requiring 24/7 care (Sue Simpson/Facebook)
Photo Description: The CLS located at the University of Saskatchewan. Courtesy: Frank Chen/Asia Times

B.C. researchers using lights brighter than the sun to curb hip implant failures

UBC-led team has discovered chemical particles corroding the body as it fights the new joint

Photo Description: The CLS located at the University of Saskatchewan. Courtesy: Frank Chen/Asia Times
B.C. sees record-breaking number of MRI and CT scans performed in a year, as province tackles long wait times (pixabay.com/jarmoluk).

B.C. breaks provincial record for number of MRI and CT scans performed

Minisitry of Health says MRIs up 20 per cent, CT exams jump 11 per cent

B.C. sees record-breaking number of MRI and CT scans performed in a year, as province tackles long wait times (pixabay.com/jarmoluk).
This undated photo provided by Daiichi Sankyo and AstraZeneca in June 2022 shows production of their Enhertu, an antibody-chemotherapy drug administered intravenously. (Daiichi Sankyo/AstraZeneca via AP)
This undated photo provided by Daiichi Sankyo and AstraZeneca in June 2022 shows production of their Enhertu, an antibody-chemotherapy drug administered intravenously. (Daiichi Sankyo/AstraZeneca via AP)
Registered Nurse Manjot Kaur Munday prepares to attend a COVID-19 patient at the COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit at Surrey Memorial Hospital in Surrey, B.C., Friday, June 4, 2021. A lack of data tracking Canadians who have had COVID-19 could hinder efforts to understand potential post-infection conditions, such as diabetes and brain fog, experts have warned. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

COVID data void in Canada could hamper understanding of lingering impact: experts

Reliance on at-home rapid testing causing major gap in COVID numbers

Registered Nurse Manjot Kaur Munday prepares to attend a COVID-19 patient at the COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit at Surrey Memorial Hospital in Surrey, B.C., Friday, June 4, 2021. A lack of data tracking Canadians who have had COVID-19 could hinder efforts to understand potential post-infection conditions, such as diabetes and brain fog, experts have warned. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward