What will be the consequences?

A reader from CHristina Lake criticizes the rollout of smart meters by FortisBC.

An open letter to Ian Dyck, manager, Electric Advanced Metering Infrastructure, FortisBC

Thank you for your package of information regarding the smart meter installations in British Columbia. I still feel the insistence by Fortis to install smart meters, purchased without sufficient research into the effects on human health (both short- and long-term), is an invasion of privacy and a case of bullying. Customers concerned about their own health and privacy are put in the position of having to pay extra charges. We become hostage.

In addition to humans now being bombarded by EMFs (electromagnetic frequencies) from all angles, I have heard stories of electronics being interfered with, and individual health issues as a result of smart meters.

You say the EMF signal gets weaker as it goes through barriers such as walls. I rent an old metal trailer with metal outside and very thin walls. Metal is a conductor of electrical energy. I am sensitive to energy and as such prefer to remain “corded” for telephone and Internet.

I also find that our personal privacy is being invaded. I sensed when Internet became available, that anything done on Internet was at risk of not being private. This has been proven. And so it will be with smart meters. No matter what you say about security, our privacy is again being invaded. We are going to be monitored even more—like Big Brother watching us.

So, Mr. Dyck, I don’t agree with what you have said about safe installations, reducing fire risks, privacy, special benefits (that really are no different from the existing service) and the health facts. They are like a smoke screen. I will continue to disagree.

What will the consequences be in say, 20 years? Has Fortis thought about that?

Rosemary Phillips,

Christina Lake

 

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