No one should profit from this madness

On the 100th anniversary of the start of the "War to End All Wars" gives pause for reflection.

As this is being written it was exactly 100 years ago that the world was counting down the final hours of peace before the outbreak of the First World War.

Over the next few years four empires would be swept from the world stage. Borders would be redrawn and new alliances formed.

They say hindsight is 20/20 and using the benefit of a 100-year lens, journalist Brian Stewart wrote an analysis for CBC of what the war meant, and continues to mean for us today.

His article is entitled The 100-year conflict that is the First World War: How a reckless dance into the abyss in 1914 set the stage for our times. It provides an overview of an opinion shared by other scholars as well.

In their book Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World, authors Margaret MacMillan and Richard Holbrooke detail how the world map was redrawn following the war —with tragic and ongoing consequences.

“The ceaseless Israel-Palestinian crisis can be traced to WWI British promises of land to both sides, promises that inevitably came into conflict,” wrote Stewart.

A more recent book —First World War: Still No End in Sight by Frank Furedi—has a title which pretty much sums up the situation we find ourselves in today.

This week we commemorate the 100th anniversary of the start of the “war to end all wars.” Next week we will remember the 69th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima.

But war continues and no end seems in sight.

Perhaps it is time—long past time, in fact—to call a spade a spade and deal with those who profit from the sale of arms as international war criminals.

The rule is “Thou shalt not kill.” Pretty simple, you would think.

 

Just Posted

Bunkhouse opens at Midway museum

Operators expect the nightly fee to be around $30

Midway seniors voice hopes, fears for aging in village

The village will host another public forum on aging on July 17

BCSS graduates off to new adventures

The BCSS Class of 2019 is the 50th cohort of Grade 12s from the school

Category 3 fires to be prohibited in Southeast Fire District

The prohibition will take effect at noon on Wednesday, June 12

Passion for planes takes off

The Grand Forks Flying Club is trying to build young interest in aviation

10 facts about Father’s Day

Did you know that the special day for dads was first celebrated in 1910?

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Revamped B.C. Lions set to battle veteran Winnipeg Blue Bombers

The Lions’ first test of the season will be a big one

No business case for Trans Mountain expansion, says former environment minister

Cabinet is expected to announce its decision on the expansion of the Alberta-to-B.C. pipeline by Tuesday

Most Read