Village of Midway approves tax exemptions

Council briefs: The Village of Midway council met for its regularly scheduled meeting on Oct. 3.

  • Oct. 7, 2016 7:00 p.m.

The Village of Midway council met for its regularly scheduled meeting on Oct. 3, discussing tax exemptions and the the resignation of  a Board of Variance member. Acting mayor Richard Dunsdon stood in for Randy Kappes, who resigned in August.

Administrators Report

Chief Administrative Officer Penny Feist asked council to approve funds for a new heater for the ambulance bay. In her report to council, Feist notes that while the heater exceeds the original budget expected for the replacement, going with the high efficiency option aligns with the village’s goal of reducing its carbon footprint, and will help them save money in the long run. Council unanimously passed the motion, approving $7, 690 for the heater.

Feist also gave a notice of the fire referendum meeting held by the RDKB on Oct. 5, encouraging councillors who are able to attend to do so.

Feist said she received a notice of resignation from board of variance member Dave Lyle, as he and his family are moving. Ads will be placed in the council newsletter and online looking for a replacement, she said.

Tax Exemptions

The Village of Midway grant annual tax exemptions to properties in the village, including faith organizations and non-profits. Feist said the letters apply for the exemptions via a letter to the village office. Up for tax exemption this year were: the King of Kings Church; the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses; the Boundary District Curling Club; the ambulance station; and The Bridge.

Councillors were unanimous on granting tax exemptions except for The Bridge, which Councillor Marguerite Rotvold voted against, citing the organization’s profit from last year, which were donated back into the community.

“It said in a letter they made $1,600 last year. It is the Midway taxpayers that are subsidizing it. Yes, Midway residents may use it and may volunteer there, but I don’t agree with it. If they made money, then why are all taxpayers exempting them?” Rotvold said.

The tax exemptions passed for all proposed properties.

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