The carcass of a male black bear was found in a popular recreation area in Qualicum Beach on Vancouver Island. - Black Press file photo

Headless bear carcass found by dog walkers in Qualicum Beach

Conservation officers believe animal was killed elsewhere and dumped near subdivision

The carcass of a male black bear, with its paws and head removed, was discovered last week by several dog walkers under power lines on Corcan Road near the Meadowood subdivision in Qualicum Beach.

The incident is now under investigation by the BC Conservation Officer Service.

Stuart Bates, acting sergeant for the Central Island, said calls about the black bear began coming in on Oct. 25 and an officer was sent to the scene on Oct.26 to remove the average-sized carcass.

Bates said the head of the bear was skinned out.

“The hide part of the head was still attached to the rest of the hide but the head was gone,” Bates said.

Bates said he has no idea what a hunter would do with these parts of a bear, except possibly clean up the skull and salvage the claws.

Conservation officers are confident the bear was killed elsewhere and dumped on Corcan Road.

“When the officer was there [the bear] had several days of decomposition but was only there for a day,” Bates said. “And the fact that it was laying on a sheet of plywood is kind of a dead give away. It didn’t get shot there and conveniently fall on a sheet of plywood.”

Bates said hunters are legally required to remove all the edible portions from animals that they harvest.

“They have to remove all the meat — the legs, the meat along the back, the rib meat and the neck meat. You have to remove that to your home or a butcher,” he said.

Bear hunting season on Vancouver Island runs until Dec. 10.

It is illegal, Bates added, to dump or leave attractants that could invite dangerous wildlife to an area frequented by humans.

‘“Whether you dump a bear carcass or a bucket of apples at a location that’s frequented by people, you could still be charged,” he said. “There are bears in towns right now, they’re literally trying to eat 20,000 calories a day. I’ve seen them eat enough rotten apples to get drunk.”

Bates urges anyone with information on who may be involved in dumping the bear carcass to call the R.A.P.P line at 1-877-952-7277.

“We hope somebody comes forward that actually seen the vehicle that dumped it. We’re presuming it was a pickup,”Bates said. “We did take DNA samples so if we do find the parts that are missing we will be able to match them.”

karly.blats@pqbnews.com

Just Posted

Fruitvale man identified in fatal zipline accident in Thailand

Spencer Donaldson, 25, was from Fruitvale, B.C., the city’s mayor has confirmed

Fruitvale man, 25, dies after falling from zipline in Thailand, reports say

Bangkok Post says man fell from Flight of the Gibbon zipline in Chiang Mai

UPDATE: Four victims identified in deadly Penticton shooting spree

John Brittain, 68, faces three counts of first-degree murder and one count of second-degree murder

Prince George sweeps to first-ever BC Hockey League crown

Spruce Kings beat Vernon Vipers 3-1 in the Okanagan Wednesday for 13th straight playoff win

Hwang’s first MLS goal lifts Whitecaps to 1-0 win over LAFC

Vancouver picks up first victory of season

Child-proof your windows ahead of warm weather: B.C. expert

Fifteen children were taken to BC Children’s Hospital for falls in 2018

B.C. trucker pleads guilty to lesser charges in fatal Manitoba crash

Gurjant Singh was fined $3,000 and given a one-year driving prohibition.

Study links preschool screen time to behavioural and attention problems

The research looked at more than 2,400 families

More than $100,000 raised for family of professional skier who died near Pemberton

Dave Treadway leaves behind his pregnant wife and two young boys

BC SPCA asks public for donations after puppy caught in trap

The puppy’s medical bills are expected to amount to more than $4,600

B.C. party bus monitors required to watch for booze, drugs on board

New rule in time for grad outings, minister Claire Trevena says

Most Read