Randall Hopley, outside of the Cranbrook courthouse on Sept. 14, 2011. (The Canadian Press)

Father of abducted boy says family wasn’t told offender had been released

Randall Hopley, who is 53, has served his six-year sentence for breaking into a home in Sparwood and abducting the sleeping three-year-old in 2011

The father of a boy who was abducted from a home in southeastern British Columbia says his family wasn’t notified about the release of the high-risk offender.

Randall Hopley, who is 53, has served his six-year sentence for breaking into a home in Sparwood and abducting the sleeping three-year-old in 2011.

He returned the boy four days later physically unharmed.

The boy’s father, who lives in northern Alberta, told CTV Calgary that his family was shocked and upset to learn about Hopley’s freedom.

READ MORE: Convicted child abductor Randall Hopley living in Vancouver

He said he is anxious about the man’s release but that his son, who is now 10 and in Grade 5, is doing well.

Vancouver police have issued a public warning about Hopley moving into the city because they say he still poses a risk of significant harm to young boys.

A National Parole Board decision released to The Canadian Press on Thursday said Hopley continues to be assessed as a high risk for sexual offending against children.

It said Hopley is bound by a 10-year supervision order in an effort to manage his risks and his conditions, including not being in the presence of any child under 16 and abiding by a curfew.

Vancouver police said Hopley will be living in a residential correctional facility but wouldn’t reveal the location.

Hopley was also designated a long-term offender after various courts heard that he sexually assaulted young children while living in a foster home as a teen.

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

B.C. Legions in need of young members to continue aiding veterans into the future

Lest we forget what thousands of men and women did to fight for Canada’s freedoms – but without new membership, many Legion chapters face dwindling numbers

From the Hill: The successes and failures of the Elections Modernization Act

Richard Cannings writes about Bill C-76 in From the Hill.

Public invited to annual watershed meeting at Christina Lake

Learn more about invasive species and management planning at Christina Lake.

Boundary Peace Initiative hosts conference in Grand Forks

The conference featured Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs.

Christina Lake teacher recognized for excellence in education

The provincial music teachers’ award is “a huge honour.”

VIDEO: Marvel Comics’ Stan Lee dies

Marvel co-creator was well-known for making cameo appearances in superhero movies

B.C. health care payroll tax approved, takes effect Jan. 1

Employers calculating cost, including property taxes increases

Nunavut urges new plan to deal with too many polar bears

Territory recommends a proposal that contradicts much of conventional scientific thinking

Shelter struggles: Landlord takes over rental unit whenever visiting B.C. town

Renter’s story highlights how hard it is to find accommodation in Revelstoke

Lack of public response threatens B.C. referendum credibility

Of the few who have voted, poll finds most rejected proportional representation

Tentative deal reached in NHL concussion lawsuit

More than 100 former players accused the league of failing to better prevent head trauma

Grim search for more fire victims; 31 dead across California

More than 8,000 firefighters battled wildfires that scorched at least 1,040 square kilometres

Politicians need to do better on social media, Trudeau says

Prime minister suggests at conference in Paris some are trying to use technology to polarize voters

Wally Buono exits CFL, stinging from painful playoff loss

B.C. Lions lost the Eastern semifinal to the Hamilton Tiger-Cats on Sunday, 48-8

Most Read