The USITC ruled that Canadian blueberries do not pose a threat to domestic American growers of the berry. (PIxabay photo)

The USITC ruled that Canadian blueberries do not pose a threat to domestic American growers of the berry. (PIxabay photo)

Canadian blueberries ruled not a threat to American producers

American trade group determines import of Canadian blueberries does not pose trade threat

The United States International Trade Commission has concluded that the import of Canadian blueberries does not pose a threat to American blueberry producers.

The decision was made following a request made by the United States Trade Representative to the International Trade Commission on Sept. 29, 2020 suggesting that they initiate an investigation into the extent to which increased imports of blueberries have caused injury or threat to domestic growers.

RELATED: U.S. blueberry trade action could affect 800 B.C. growers

The USITC vote, which occurred on Feb. 11, resulted in a unanimous 5-0 vote. A public report based on the investigation will be available for the public to view later this year.

The BC Blueberry Council stated they are pleased with the decision.

“Now our members can focus on the growing year ahead, instead of being concerned with trade penalties,” said BC Blueberry council chair Jack Bates.

According to a press release from the BC Blueberry Council, its members were proactive from the onset of the investigation, working with the Canadian and provincial government to prepare a defense and monitor the situation.

RELATED: B.C. helps fund blueberry farmers against U.S. trade commission investigation

Parm Bains, the president of Abbotsford-based Westberry Farms, stated the decision is a positive step forward for local growers.

“Getting a confirmation from the authorities proves the position we have always stood by,” he said. “We look forward to continuing to strengthen business ties and work closely with the United States High Bush Blueberry Council (USHBC) and blueberry buyers and brokers in promoting blueberries in North America.”

John Tentomas, the president and CEO of Abbotsford-based Nature’s Touch, was also satisfied with the ruling.

“Blueberries, both cultivated and wild, are very important industries that are fulfilling health and wellness needs of consumers in both the USA and Canada,” he said. “We face the same opportunities and challenges and have managed them together, as true industry and government peers. We are thankful that this decision continues to reflect on this partnership.”

According to the release, the U.S. is an important market for the B.C. blueberry industry, with approximately 100 million pounds destined for the United States each season.

British Columbia

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Pastafarian Gary Smith, pictured here dressed as a pirate, wanted to wear his tricorn (also pictured here) in his driver’s licence photo, arguing that the display was a religious observance. Photo: Facebook
B.C. Pastafarian loses Supreme Court fight to wear pirate hat in driver’s licence photo

Grand Forks’ Gary Smith put his case to the Supreme Court in Rossland early last month

Island Health chief medical officer Dr. Richard Stanwick receives a first dose of Pfizer vaccine, Dec. 22, 2020. (B.C. government)
COVID-19: B.C. seniors aged 90+ can start to sign up for vaccination on March 8

Long-term care residents protected by shots already given

BC Ambulance Crews prepare to evacuate a sick Greenwood boy by helicopter on Friday, Feb. 26. Photo: Submitted
Greenwood boy taken to hospital by BC Ambulance helicopter

Greenwood volunteer firefighters helped prepare the chopper’s landing

Sylvain Fabi, Canada’s chief negotiator for the Columbia River Treaty, joined a number of government and Indigenous government stakeholders for a virtual town hall on Feb. 24, 2021, to update the state of the Columbia River Treaty negotiations. Trevor Crawley photo/Zoom screenshot
Indigenous input key to Columbia River Treaty negotiations

Ecosystem function included in negotiations along with flood management and power generation priorities

Thursday, Feb. 4: RDKB Chief Engineer Darryl Funk hoists a banner commemorating last year’s championship season by the Bantam House Bruins. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Bantam Bruins honoured at hair-raising banner ceremony at Grand Forks’ Jack Goddard Arena

Asst. coach Mike Tollis said he reluctantly gave in to the team’s victory wish that he cut his pony tale

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s coronavirus situation, May 8, 2020. (B.C. government photo)
B.C.’s weekend COVID-19 cases: 532 Saturday, 508 Sunday, 438 Monday

Fraser Health still has most, eight more coronavirus deaths

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

B.C. Attorney General David Eby speaks in the legislature, Dec. 7, 2020. Eby was given responsibility for housing after the October 2020 provincial election. (Hansard TV)
B.C. extends COVID-19 rent freeze again, to the end of 2021

‘Renoviction’ rules tightened, rent capped to inflation in 2022

Face mask hangs from a rear-view mirror. (Black Press image)
B.C. CDC unveils guide on how to carpool during the pandemic

Wearing masks, keeping windows open key to slowing the spread of COVID-19

Churches, including Langley’s Riverside Calvary Church, are challenging the regulations barring them from holding in-person worship services during COVID-19. (Langley Advance Times file)
Gas prices jumped in Golden to 131.9c this week, a trend that's supposed to continue into the summer. (Claire Palmer/Golden Star)
Columbia River-Revelstoke MLA Clovechok concerned as gas prices continue to rise

Fuel prices are supposed to skyrocket this summer as British Columbians await BCUC analysis

The area shaded in yellow was purchased last year by the Regional District of Central Kootenay. The purple area is the current purchase. Map: Submitted
Cottonwood Lake fundraiser reaches goal

The Nelson community group has raised $400,000 to purchase 40 hectares of forest

Det. Sgt. Jim Callender. (Hamilton Police Service screenshot)
B.C. man dead, woman seriously injured after shooting in Hamilton, Ont.

The man was in the process of moving to the greater Toronto area, police say

Most Read