Brace for ‘Godzilla El Nino’

“This definitely has the potential of being the Godzilla El Niño,” said Patzert,

“If you thought the winter of 2014 to 2015 was warm and dry, think again. Scientists are predicting this coming season to bring the strongest El Nino since 1997.”

So say the weather prognosticators about the upcoming year, which does not bode well for everything from crops to the potential for wildfires, to another bust season for many ski resorts.

Dubbed the “Godzilla El Niño” by NASA scientist Bill Patzert, this year’s weather pattern is predicted to bring substantial moisture to normally dry regions and dry weather to areas more accustomed to rain and snow.

While this may herald a start to the end of California’s current drought, it does not promise much in the way of moisture to B.C., including the coastal regions, which are predicted to struggle again with a low snowpack, below-normal precipitation and unseasonably warm temperatures.

This scenario may not be at all disappointing for the average Vancouverite, but this weather pattern could have an extremely negative impact on various industries throughout the province. Without a solid snowpack, already arid regions like the Boundary will struggle with crop growth, aquifer levels and, as its residents learned this year, the extreme risk of wildfires.

The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration declared the arrival of the “long-anticipated” El Niño back in March, citing records of above-average sea temperatures in the eastern tropical Pacific. It has certainly lived up to expectations, with unpredictable weather patterns the norm across the continent.

“This definitely has the potential of being the Godzilla El Niño,” said Patzert, who is a climatologist with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He also claims that signals from the Pacific Ocean indicate this El Niño is stronger than that which occurred in 1997, the most powerful El Niño on record.

“This potentially could be the El Niño of our generation,” he told the Los Angeles Times.

Just Posted

Presenting the Graduates of 2018

BCSS celebrated the 2018 grads last weekend.

30 degrees and warmer forecasted with heat wave in B.C.

The weather could stay well into next week, according to Environment Canada

Rock Creek Community Medical celebrates 40 years

The society started with a donation of land.

‘Daddy bonus’ common in B.C. workplaces, study finds

UBC researchers say dads don’t have to be number one in the office to get a raise

The only firestorm in Trail was on social media

Power outage set off alarms at Teck Trail; company says no fire or flooding

REPLAY: B.C. this week in video

In case you missed it, here’s a look at replay-worthy highlights from across the province this week

B.C. NHL prospect expected to make ‘full recovery’ after an incident in Calgary

Jordy Bellerive was injured in a reported house fire Saturday night

BC Lions defensive back Marcell Young levels streaker in home opener

Young hit the fan near one of the 45-yard lines

Police: Taxi driver who hit 8 Moscow pedestrians fell asleep

Two Mexican World Cup fans were among those hit

B.C. VIEWS: Orphans of our urban drug culture neglected again

Child advocate Bernard Richard leaves B.C. with harsh message

From marijuana beer to pot cookies, Canadian companies creating cannabis edibles

Manufacturers think that edibles will do well with users who don’t want to smoke or vape

Privacy lawyer warns against victim blaming in recent sextortion scams

Perpetrators get sexual photos of the victim and threaten to share them with friends and families

QB Jennings leads Lions to 22-10 win over Alouettes

B.C. wins CFL home opener over Montreal

Most Read