The safest way to transport animals is in a secured crate in a truck box. (BC SPCA)

BC SPCA: Don’t drive with pets in the back of your truck

Society says the safest way to transport your furry friends is in a secured crate

Pets love to get to the beach as much as their owners during the summer, but the BC SPCA is reminding the public to secure their animals in the vehicle while driving.

“This time of year, we start to see more people taking their pets, particularly dogs, with them on road trips or camping. We recommend that pets are kept inside the vehicle in a secured crate or restrained with a dog seatbelt,” said Lorie Chortyk, the SPCA’s general manager, communications.

Drivers can be distracted by untrained pets. Pets can also be launched from the vehicle if it crashes, and cause injuries not only to themselves, but to other people in the car.

RELATED: Keep your pets safe while driving

Dogs also tied up with ropes or ties can accidentally hang themselves.

Weather can also play a part. Depending on if it’s too hot or too cold, pets can suffer from heatstroke or hypothermia.

According to the SPCA, the safest way a pet can be transported is in a secured crate in the centre of a truck box or short leads cross-tied to a harness.

Section 72 of the B.C. Motor Vehicle Act and Section 9.3 of B.C. Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act makes it illegal to transport unsecured pets in the back of a pickup truck.

“If you see a dog that is unattached in the back of a pickup truck, call 911 to report the license plate number, make and model of the vehicle and provide a description of the dog,” said Chortyk.


brendan.jure@100milefreepress.net

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