Alan Cooper, President of the Phoenix Foundation of Boundary Communities, said micro-grants have the biggest impact in small communities. Photo: Laurie Tritschler

Alan Cooper, President of the Phoenix Foundation of Boundary Communities, said micro-grants have the biggest impact in small communities. Photo: Laurie Tritschler

Phoenix Foundation partners with micro-grants program

The grants will fund small-scale community projects

Community organizations in southeastern B.C are partnering to make small financial grants available to people seeking to spur neighbourhood connections.

Alan Cooper, President of the Boundary’s Phoenix Foundation (PF), said the grants will range from $50 to $500 — reasonable amounts, he said, for local projects like lending libraries, block parties and plant exchanges.

“The whole idea is to bring communities together, to support creativity,” he explained.

“It’s based on the principle that these micro-grants can have the biggest impact in small communities: Anyone with any idea can apply,” he continued.

READ MORE: Boundary teacher uses grant, community donations to open communal library

The grants are funded through the Vancouver Foundation (VF), a community-building organization that funded Boundary teacher Anita Taylor’s “little library” last summer.

Cooper said that grant applications will soon be available through PF’s website at phoenix-foundation.ca.

The PF is working with the Penticton-based Community Foundation of the South Okanagan to spread the word among communities across the Boundary-Similkameen region, Cooper said.


 

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