Depression recovery at issue

The Kettle Valley Seventh-day Adventist Church, will be hosting an eight-week DVD seminar on depression that begins on Feb. 1 in Rock Creek.

More than 19 million people in the United States suffer from depression annually and during stressful times, this disease can intensify. Many factors can lead to depression including unrealistic goals, added financial stress (especially around Christmas/New Year), family expectations, and change of schedule or eating patterns. But the cure may not be as difficult as you might think. Actually, just a few basic lifestyle changes can help you break free of the trap of depression.

Neil Nedley, MD has put together his eight-week Depression Recovery Program from his 20 plus years of research and clinical experience. Harald Zinner, leader for the Kettle Valley Seventh-day Adventist Church, will be hosting the Nedley Depression Recovery Program on DVD.

The program begins Sunday, February 1, 2015 from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Rock Creek Medical Centre. It will help you identify the underlying causes, or “hits,” which bring on depression. “Every case is as different as each individual, but the Ten Hit Categories summarize all the possible causes for depression. Determining your causes can be as simple as taking the depression questionnaire in this program,” said Nedley.

Dr. Nedley, author of the books “Proof Positive” and “Depression: the Way Out,” will teach participants how to improve brain function, maximize IQ in children, increase energy, boost concentration, engage in healthy sleep habits, improve physical performance, and gain renewed hope. In addition to the essential information on lifestyle and diet, Nedley will also cover the benefits and risks of psychiatric counselling and drug medications.

Zinner said that this seminar is not only excellent for people who are depressed, but also for those who have family members or friends who are depressed. It will focus on brain health and what a person can do to treat depression as well as the healthy lifestyle habits they can adopt to keep depression from ever happening; even for those with a genetic predisposition to mental illness.

Zinner said that those attending the sessions will learn how to establish and maintain a strong exercise program, understand depression, eliminate negative habits of body and mind, develop healthy eating habits, and get more out of the day by enhancing brain function. Participants will spend less time frustrated by stress, decrease the risk for many diseases, say goodbye to negative thinking, and understand the true power of positive thinking.

“Dr. Nedley will show better ways to combat depression—how to know what you can change and what you cannot, the importance of minimizing drug medicine use, and how to make use of effective natural therapies,” Stone said.

Those interested should call Harald Zinner at 250-446-2517.

 

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