B.C. budget still in the black, barely

Finance Minister Mike de Jong says job growth isn't where it should be, sales tax collection to be stepped up

Finance Minister Mike de Jong shows changes in budget update

VICTORIA – With half of the fiscal year in the books, the B.C. government is clinging to a small surplus that was promised in this spring’s election.

Finance Minister Mike de Jong presented the province’s second quarter budget update Wednesday, projecting that the fiscal year will end in March with a surplus of $165 million. That’s up $29 million from the September budget update. Corporate tax revenue is higher than expected, making up for personal tax revenue that was $284 million less than forecast.

Part of the decline in personal income tax is due to employment, which de Jong said was disappointingly “flat lined” so far in 2013. He said unemployment has “dropped modestly” and full-time employment has grown, but the province has work to do to meet its jobs plan goal.

NDP finance critic Mike Farnworth said the heavily advertised jobs plan is a flop, and the unemployment rate is down largely because 12,500 people have left B.C. to seek work since the plan was launched two years ago.

“Just look at the job numbers,” Farnworth said. “By their own admission, they’re pathetic.”

Another revenue loss for the B.C. treasury is provincial sales tax revenue, which is running $100 million below the budget forecast for the year. De Jong said one factor in that is that not all businesses have registered to collect and remit the PST since the province cancelled the harmonized sales tax last March.

More than 102,000 businesses have applied to register for the PST, and the finance ministry is continuing to assist businesses with seminars and one-on-one consultations on switching over.

De Jong said finance ministry staff have given businesses time to adjust and comply, but the grace period is ending.

“As we move into 2014, we’re going to expect people to fulfil their obligations and remit PST that they are obliged to, and officials will be pursuing that with the diligence that you would expect,” de Jong said.

 

Just Posted

Federal candidates debate environmental issues in Castlegar

Few sparks and much agreement between candidates that action is needed

Check your mail for your Voter Information Card

Your Voter Information Card identifies where you can vote in advance and on election day

WATCH: South Okanagan-West Kootenay candidates answer students’ questions at Grand Forks forums

The Grand Forks Gazette filmed the all-candidates’ public forum, held Oct. 8 at Grand Forks Secondary

Grand Forks affordable housing units ready for occupancy

Tenants may begin moving in by early November

Greenwood Board of Trade to host weekly community bonfires through October

The community fires will run every Sunday from 7 to 10 p.m., starting Oct. 6

Election 2019: Connie Denesiuk – Liberal Party candidate for South Okanagan – West Kootenay

Connie Denesiuk is running for the Liberal Party in the South Okanagan – West Kootenay riding

UPDATE: British couple vacationing in Vancouver detained in U.S. after crossing border

CBP claims individuals were denied travel authorization, crossing was deliberate

After losing two baby boys, B.C. parents hope to cut through the taboo of infant death

Oct. 15 is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day in B.C.

Cheating husband sues mistress for gifted ring after wife learns about affair

The husband gave his mistress $1,000 to buy herself a ring in December 2017

B.C. massage therapist reprimanded, fined for exposing patients’ breasts

Registered massage therapist admits professional misconduct

B.C. boosts legal aid funding in new payment contract

‘Duty counsel’ service restored in some communities, David Eby says

Rugby Canada helps recovery efforts in Japan after typhoon cancels final match

Canadian players wanted to “give back in whatever small way they could”

Alberta to join B.C.’s class-action lawsuit against opioid manufacturers, distributors

B.C. government claims opioids were falsely marketed as less addictive than other pain meds

Most Read